Watch Sentinel-3B Launch Live

The next Sentinel satellite for Europe’s environmental monitoring Copernicus programme is ready for liftoff from the Plesetsk cosmodrome in northern Russia. Sentinel-3B will join its twin, Sentinel-3A, in orbit to systematically monitor Earth’s oceans, land, ice and atmosphere.

The Sentinel-3B satellite arrived in Russia in mid-March and today at 19:57 CEST it will be launched. Sentinel-3A measures our oceans, land, ice and atmosphere since February 2016.

The information feeds a range of practical applications, and it is used for monitoring and understanding large-scale global dynamics such as ocean surface temperature, aquatic biological productivity, ocean pollution and sea-level change. The mission also delivers unique and timely information about changing land cover, vegetation, urban heat islands, and for tracking wildfires. With the Sentinel-1 and Sentinel-2 pairs already in orbit monitoring our environment, the launch of Sentinel-3B means that three mission constellations will be complete. In addition, since October 2017, Sentinel-5P, a single-satellite mission to monitor air pollution, has been in orbit.

 

Follow the launch live

The European Space Agency (ESA) is offering a live broadcast of the Sentinel-3B launch. The live web stream will begin at 19:30 CEST and end at 21:40 CEST, and is divided in two parts:

  • 19:30-20:15 CEST. Last preparations at Plesetsk, liftoff, and updates from ESA’s mission control in Darmstadt, Germany
  • 21:10-21:40 CEST. Updates from mission control in Darmstadt on separation and acquisition of signal

 

 

 

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